Category Archives: Forms

Posts featuring the wide variety of forms that can be created using encaustigraphics or e-graphics.

Tiny Trees

Ever experimenting… these tiny trees have braised copper trunks and branches with small e*graphic leaves attached by very fine copper wire. Definitely an exercise in control and patience, but very satisfying results.

Pink-leaf tiny tree
Tiny tree, about 5″ tall, made from thick braised copper wire and small e*graphic leaves attached by fine copper wire.
Yellow-leaf tiny tree
A second tiny tree with trunk and branches formed from thick, braised copper wire and small e*graphic leaves attached with fine copper wire. About 5″ tall, and arranged on driftwood with stone stacks and a tiny halo house.

Work in Permanent Collection of EAINM

I’m honored to have my work included in the Permanent Collection of the Encaustic Art Institute of New Mexico, located in Santa Fe. Titled VLA (for “very luminous array,” a nod to the Very Large Array in Socorro, New Mexico), it was thrilling to see them installed for others to enjoy. Each piece is made with encaustigraphs, along with copper or steel wire, and a finial of translucent polymer clay in a braised copper circle. Lengths vary from 66 to 72″.

VLA—a “very luminous array” of five e*graphic suspensions, now in the Permanent Collection of the Encaustic Art Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Very Luminous Array
VLA, or Very Luminous Array, a group of five encaustigraphic suspensions, now in the Permanent Collection of the Encaustic Art Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Snow fun

Just for fun… e*graphic suspensions with a companion cairn in the snow.

A little picture of e*graphics out in the natural world, just for fun. I do love the colors against the snow. It’s wonderful to be able to add color to the surroundings when in the midst of grey and cold.

Still growing…

Me with my largest works to date—human sized!

Thanks to my friend Jean who took this photo before the BIG snows fell in Michigan. It’s been quite fun to see how e*graphics can be used in very large works, as well as in the smaller, more intimate forms of jewelry, books and window sculpture.

 

Unfurling

Creating ever taller suspensions— I love the way previous work can be used with recently created pieces and reconfigured in infinite new combinations.

Very Large Array prototype

Well, perhaps not extremely large, but the biggest and tallest e*graphics grouping yet! Catching the glow of the afternoon sun, the tallest suspensions measure over 6′. {Note on March 13, 2018: these were the first of the large creations that eventually evolved into the VLA piece I created for the Permanent Collection of the Encaustic Art Insitute in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Photos of that installation are soon to come.]

E*graphic suspension array
A gathering of e*graphic suspensions in the afternoon light.

Early Light

Photographing e*graphics can be tricky… they come alive when the light shines through them, but that same illumination can take over the light meter on a camera. Early and late light (along with using the camera’s manual settings) offer moments to capture a creation at its best and this morning’s sun cooperated beautifully.

Early morning light illuminates an e*graphic suspension
Early morning light illuminates an e*graphic suspension

Joyful

Joyful——an encaustigraphic suspension
Joyful

This new suspension was just sent off to the Encaustic Art Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico. I’m very excited to have this piece, titled “Joyful,” on display. Attachment points are sewn with fishing swivels to give it more movement, with the circumference of the top portion at 4.5″, and an overall length of 48″, giving it a long, graceful look.

Spinners!

E*graphics out-of-doors! I’ve found they can fly pretty vigorously in strong winds, so I used painted stones for some additional weight at the bottom. Love when the light comes through them as they spin in the breeze.

4 spinners
Four spinners